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Beading Techniques

Square Stitch Clasp - Option 1

Step 1To create the catch side of the clasp. Weave your thread back into the second to the last row. Step 2You will exit out the forth bead on the second row. Step 3Go up through the bead directly above it. Step 4Exit out the third bead from the end, this will place your thread in the center of your bracelet. Step 5Pick

Flat Square Stitch

Step 1Cut a piece of thread about 5 feet long. Thread your needle. Step 2Use Thread Heaven to condition your thread. This will help prevent fraying. Step 3Add a mini bead stopper about one foot from the end of your thread. Squeeze the two loops to open the bead stopper. Step 4Add thread to the mini bead stopper and release the loops. This will help prevent

Tubular Herringbone Clasp - Option 1

Step 1Once you have completed your tubular herringbone piece, make sure that the needle is exiting from the first A bead in the last row. Step 2String a large bead that is wide enough in diameter to cover most of the end of the tubular herringbone. In this case, we are using an 8mm crystalrondelle. Step 3String on the clasp. Step 4Go back down through

Tubular Herringbone Stitch

Step 1For a tubular herringbone design, choose the colors you want to work with. For this technique, I have chosen four colors - color A, color B, color C, and color D. Step 2Cut a 4 foot piece of beading thread. Thread the needle. Step 3To begin, start by making a bead ladder. We are creating a 2-row bead ladder which is easier to hold onto than a single-row bead ladder. Begin by stringing fo

Basic Herringbone Stitch

Step 1For a basic flat herringbone design, choose the colors you want to work with. For this technique, we have choosen three colors - color A, color B and color C. Step 2Cut a piece of thread about 5 feet long. Thread your needle. Step 3Add a mini bead stopper about one foot from the end of your thread. Squeeze the two loops to open the bead stopper. Step 4

Brick Stitch Around a Bead

Step 1Thread a beading needle with approximately 5 feet of FireLine thread. String a round bead. Leave a six-inch tail. Bring the thread around the outside of the bead to the other end of the hole and pass back through the bead. Repeat, leaving a doubled thread loop on the outside of the bead. Step 2Bring the thread around the outside of the bead to the other end of the hole and pass back through the bead making a loop of thread

Brick Stitch on a Component

Step 1Cut 4 feet of FireLine thread. Loop the thread around thecomponent and tie a surgeon’s knot, leaving a six-inch tail.Pull the knot tight. Thread a size 12 beading needle on thelong end of the thread. Step 2To start your first row, string two seed beads. Step 3Rest the two beads on the edge of the component. Theyshould sit side by side. Bring the needle behind thecomponen

Basic Brick Stitch - Decreasing

Step 1Create a bead ladder as shown in steps 1-13 of the Basic BrickStitch technique. Step 2To begin decreasing, string two seed beads. Step 3Skip over the first exposed thread loop, and pass the needlethrough the second thread loop. Step 4Pass back through the last bead added and pull the threadtaut. Step 5String

Basic Brick Stitch

Step 1To begin, start by making a bead ladder. String two beads.Leave a 6-inch thread tail. Step 2Pass back through both beads. Pull the thread taut, so thetwo beads sit next to one another. Step 3Pass back up through the first bead. Step 4Pass back down through the second bead. Step 5String one bead.

Coral Fringe

Step 1The thread can be the working thread from creating the beadwork, or a fresh, new thread can be added before starting the coral fringe. Begin with the needle and thread exiting the side of a section of beadwork Step 2String enough beads to make the coral fringe the desired length. This branch is the longest stem of the coral. The side branches will originate from this main branch. Step 3S

Leaf Fringe

Step 1The thread can be the working thread from creating thebeadwork, or a fresh, new thread can be added before startingthe leaf fringe. Begin with the needle and thread exiting theside of a section of beadwork. Step 2String enough beads to make the fringe the desired length. Step 3Pass the needle back through the second to last bead strung. Step 4St

Straight Fringe

Step 1The thread can be the working thread from creating the beadwork, or a fresh, new thread can be added before starting the straight fringe. Begin with the needle and thread exiting the side of a section of beadwork. Step 2String enough beads to make the straight fringe the desired length. Step 3Skipping over the last bead strung, pass back through the rest of the beads strung.

Bead Embroidery Clasp - Option 1

Step 1Once you have completed an embroidered piece; find a tube bar clasp that has a bar with the same width as your embroidered piece. Make sure you have left enough room at the end of the piece to attach a clasp. Step 2Fold over the Lacy's Stiff Stuff so the beads are resting against the tube bar. Step 3Trim the Lacy's Stiff Stuff so you have about a 1/4" inch overlap.

Using a Perfect End Thread Burner

Step 1Once you have completed your bead woven piece, cut the thread. Step 2Push and hold the button of the Thread Burner. The element tip will begin to heat up. Step 3Touch the element tip of the Thread Burner to the end of the thread. Step 4Burn, or melt, the end of your thread until the end is no longer visible.

Crocheted Rope Clasp - Option 1

Step 1When the rope is crocheted to the desired length, cut the yarn, leaving an 8-inch tail. Pull the tail through the last loop to make a knot. Step 2String a small tapestry needle on the tail. Step 3Insert the needle through the left side of the yarn holding the bead, one counterclockwise step from the knot. If you were continuing to crochet, this is the bead you would have stitched into ne

Crocheted Rope - Invisible Join

Step 1When the rope reaches the desired length, make sure the ends will lock together without twisting the rope. In this case since we were using a 6 bead pattern, the last bead added here (fuchsia) will match up with the 6th bead added at the beginning. If the ends match up, cut the yarn, leaving an 8-inch tail. Pull the tail through the last loop to make a knot. Step 2Thread a small tapestry needle on the beginning yarn tail.

Crocheted Rope

Step 1Leave the pearl cotton yarn on the spool. Thread the end through a twisted wire needle. Twisted wire needles are flexible, and although the eye looks big, it will collapse down when pulled through a bead. Use the needle to string all of the beads you will need for the project. Step 2To help show the technique more easily, here we will show a six-bead rope, with each bead shown in a different color. String the beads in the s

Basic Bead Crochet

Step 1Leave the pearl cotton yarn on the spool. Thread the end through a twisted wire needle. Twisted wire needles are flexible, and although the eye looks big, it will collapse down when pulled through a bead. Use the needle to string all of the beads you will need for the project. Tip: String more beads than you think you will need, since it will be impossible to add more once you have begun to stitch. Step 2After you finish st
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