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Horizontal Beaded Netting Diagram Tutorial

Horizontal Beaded Netting Diagram Tutorial

Stitch the First Two Rows of Horizontal Netting


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Horizontal beaded netting is a lacy, open stitch that involves picking up sets of beads with each stitch. Each row of horizontal netting is made up of a zig- zagging horizontal line of beads.

Review how to prepare your needle and thread for beadweaving.

Learn how to secure a stop bead on your thread.

Begin a horizontal netting pattern by stringing all of the beads for the first row of beadwork, plus several more beads. Those extra beads enable you to make the turn that begins the second row.

Note: The beads in the first row will be pulled into position when you stitch the second row. This is similar to how you begin peyote stitch by stringing all of the beads for the first two rows. In fact, peyote stitch is really a dense form of horizontal netting.

Review the best way to hold your beadwork while you stitch.

To begin the second row, you pass back through one of the beads in the first row. This bead serves as a link bead, and you locate it by checking your pattern. You then pick up an odd number of beads (often three or five, depending on the pattern), and pass back through the next link bead. Continue this process until you reach the end of the second row.

In the topmost diagram above, a total of twenty beads have been strung. The second diagram shows the thread passing back through the eighth from last bead, which is a link bead. In the third diagram, three beads are picked up, three beads in the first row are skipped over, and the thread passes back through another link bead.

The bottom diagram shows the first and second rows completed and the thread positioned near the end of the second row. This row actually ends when you pick up another set of beads to make the turn that begins the third row.

Continue Adding Rows of Horizontal Netting

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You now pick up an odd number of beads to make the turn and begin the third row. These beads are referred to as \"turning beads.\" The precise number of turning beads you pick up varies by pattern. In the topmost diagram above, there are five turning beads.

After making the turn, continue the netting stitch (from page 1) back toward the opposite edge of the beadwork. Notice that the middle bead in each set of beads you stitched in the second row now becomes a link bead.

At the end of the third row, pick up another set of turning beads. The second diagram above shows five more turning beads picked up to make the next turn.

Continue stitching one row at a time, using turning beads to change direction at the end of each row. The bottom diagram above shows the resulting thread path through the first five rows of beadwork. You can continue stitching in this manner until you reach the end of your pattern.